implant

‘Growing Pains’ actor Jeremy Miller credits implant for helping his alcoholism

"Growing Pains" actor Jeremy Miller credits a new implant for assist him with his alcoholism.

Original Source: foxnews.com

A healthcare company that says it can curtail addiction by inserting a long-lasting implant of an FDA-approved medicine proven to reduce cravings for drugs and alcohol has a vocal supporter in Jeremy Miller, the “Growing Pains” actor who credits the company, BioCorRx, with his recovery.

“It was an absolute game changer for me,” Miller told FOX Business’ Stuart Varney on Wednesday.

“I had struggled for 15 years. I’d been trying to stop for maybe three years solid before this … I ran the gamut. And I had given up hope.”

In a minor medical procedure, a pellet of Naltrexone is inserted into the fat tissue of the lower left or right quadrant. Over the course of a few months, the medicine slowly releases into the body to curb cravings for alcohol or opioids and to block the euphoric effects of those substances, according to Brady Granier, CEO of the healthcare company.

Miller began drinking at age 19, and by 21, he couldn’t go longer than a day without alcohol. Finally, he decided to seek help. After inpatient and outpatient care, meditation, holistic therapy and the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous failed to help him, Miller decided to try the implant in 2011. He noticed the difference within hours: The constant, obsessive need for alcohol vanished.

“It was like a light switch got turned off for me,” he said.

Besides some restlessness the first few days, Miller described almost no side effects from the drug, which he credits to the slow release of the pellet.

“To actually be able to think, to get up in the morning and get something accomplished for my family is amazing,” Miller said.

About 1,000 patients have received the implant, which could cost between $10,000 and $12,000, Granier said. He estimated a success rate of about 80%, depending on whether people choose to undergo the treatment in conjunction with such support systems as group therapy.

%d bloggers like this: